Resources

20 December 2006

TRIPS, ACCESS TO MEDICINES AND DEVELOPING NATIONS: TOWARDS AN OPEN SOURCE SOLUTION. By Krishna Ravi Srinivas. Indian Institute of Management-Bangalore Working Paper 248, November 2006. The extent to which intellectual property rights (IPRs) facilitate or hinder the development of new drugs and access to medicine for neglected diseases in developing nations is a controversial issue. The harmonisation of the global IP regime under the norms of the WTO Agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) has eliminated many of the options earlier available to developing nations, such as only granting process (rather than product) patents. A report on the problem by the WHO Commission on Intellectual Property Rights, Innovation and Public Health (CIPIH) has suggested some solutions to the vexing question of IPRs and access to drugs in developing nations. This paper analyses the potential and pitfalls of one particular solution -- using an open source model as a potential model for drug discovery. It points out that this model could be useful for developing nations, and suggests that developing nations should give this model serious consideration and try to use it to promote the development of medicines for neglected and most neglected diseases. The paper says that while open source model is not a panacea, it is certainly a model worth examining and encouraging. Available online at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=952435.

SUSPENSION OF THE DOHA ROUND TALKS: THE COST OF IMPLICATIONS FOR INDIA. By Pradeep S. Mehta and Pranav Kumar. CUTS International, October 2006. This briefing paper from the Consumer Unity and Trust Society (CUTS) analyses the potential costs for India of a failure of the Doha Round. The authors argue that India should make all efforts to revive and conclude the Doha Round of negotiations, as overall the country will gain much from multilateral liberalisation; and that India should seek a balance between market access and development dimensions of international trade while taking the Doha Round of negotiations forward. To access this paper, visit http://www.cuts-citee.org/pdf/BP06-WTO-4.pdf.

FISHERIES, INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: POLICY DISCUSSION PAPER. International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD), October 2006. This policy discussion paper aims to provide policymakers, scientists, advocacy groups, journalists and those engaged in the fishing industry with an overview of the key linkages, tensions and policy debates at the intersection of fisheries and international trade. The paper does not advocate a particular perspective or make recommendations. Instead, it simply endeavours to highlight different views and policy options. Part One of the paper reviews the key economic, environmental and social factors that influence the management, harvest, production and trade of fisheries resources, calling attention to trade trends and the precarious state of fish stocks. Part Two reviews the key trade-related areas of international policy debate relevant to the fisheries sector: tariff liberalisation; safeguards and anti-dumping; standards and other non-tariff barriers; ecolabelling; subsidies; access agreements; and trade-related measures to promote fisheries management and environmental protection. The paper concludes with a summary of the linkages between trade policy issues and sustainable development priorities, and a set of proposals for further research. To access the paper visit http://www.trade-environment.org/page/ictsd/projects/fish_pp.htm.  

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20 December 2006
EU MEMBER STATES BACK AUSTRIAN BAN ON BIOTECH PRODUCTS In a resounding defeat for the European Commission, a large majority of EU member states on 18 December voted in support of Austria's right to...
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20 December 2006
Months after the Doha Round negotiations were suspended in July, WTO Members on 12 December restarted informal discussions on how to discipline fisheries subsidies. The largely technical debate...
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